The Snitch

Just a little of everything HR

HRTV: Best coaches on diverse cultures

with one comment

Singapore – Instead of using classroom training to help new leaders learn and manage intercultural differences across diverse offices, the best coaches are found within the company.

It is important that companies find the right coaches to help leaders on understanding cultural differences, according to Fons Trompenaars, one of the top 50 most influential management thinkers alive as identified by Thinker 50.

The good news is Trompenaars says the best coaches are already available within the company. They would be senior leaders who are familiar with the business scope, who understand the depth of cultures they have worked in, and had experience managing both intercultural and international teams. Pairing them up with new leaders will help the newbie learn far better than in a classroom setting.

However, the managing director of Trompenaars Hampden-Turner Intercultural Management Consulting says improving a manager’s intercultural people skills is similar to grasping a foreign language. Both require the learner to invest time and effort in to learn and practise the skills on a daily basis.

“You cannot learn a new language in half a day. For some, it takes a lifetime,” Trompenaars said. “[It is the] same with cultural differences.”

Trompenaars suggests using a “modular approach” to help leaders understand cultural differences when they are posted to a new country. Breaking up the learning process into bite-sized modules will give them opportunities to apply what they have learnt in their everyday life.

The module should also include a process that allows leaders to exchange feedback with their internal trainers and the local teams. Trompenaars says leaders can then create their own case studies and share that information with others when it’s their turn to coach on cultural diversity.

Advertisements

One Response

Subscribe to comments with RSS.

  1. That is the “ideal” but oftentimes, some of these same leaders offered a skewed version of the culture[s] they work in. That is, their viewpoints are the one true correct version. They did NOT attempt to understand nor verify if what they observed is correct. Especially so with Asian cultures that emphasised on face saving.

    I suggest that you find out too from the Asian perspective through Asian cross-cultural specialists. Rather than quoting someone who appoint themselves as an expert of cultures that they have superficial knowledge of. Trompenaars might be a *guru* but if you analyse his theories carefully, they only serve to re-affirm existing prejudices.

    AT

    July 13, 2011 at 4:40 pm


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: