The Snitch

Just a little of everything HR

Posts Tagged ‘social media

When Facebook isn’t your friend

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So, you’ve just scored the job interview of your dreams (or at least something close) and you’ve done your research on the company. Right about now, I’d bet you’re feeling pretty confident and prepared for any curveballs they may throw your way.

And then your interviewer asks: “Can you please log into Facebook right now so we can have a look around?”

This week, we ran a Bizarre HR about just that – companies that ask for Facebook logins to access potential employee’s profiles to gain a more, let’s call it “holistic”, understanding of the candidate.

I don’t know about you, but that’s sort of a deal breaker for me. Sure, there are a couple of things on Facebook I wouldn’t want my colleagues to find out about, but there has to be some kind of moral law (or actual law) against this. Right?

If you’ve been following The Snitch for a while now, you’d remember my attempt at staying off Facebook (obviously I went crawling back) so trust me when I say I understand the cheap thrill in venting about the co-worker who wouldn’t stop singing National Day songs in March, or how painful my last work trip was thanks to obnoxious cab drivers and inconsistent meeting times.

However, in the corporate world, a little discretion can never hurt. In the upcoming April magazine, editor Rebecca Lewis writes about the potentially disastrous effects a pissed off employee can have when they go on an online rampage.

Think about it. Here is someone with potentially sensitive information who believes they have been disengaged/insulted/mistreated (delete where appropriate) and has decided the best way to cool off is to broadcast their woes online.

Even something as simple as “Can’t people tell I’ve only got two hands?!” (I’ll admit I’ve tweeted that) can give the wrong impression. And this is if your profile is public.

Is anything even sacred anymore?

I’ve spoken to a couple of HR heads, and while most are against banning social media at work (“They’ll access it on their phones anyway,” one lamented), they do recognise the need to manage it.

With technology progressing faster than you can say Zuckerberg, and Gen Y’s who practically come out of the womb with an iPhone, there is no escaping the fact that social media is part of life.

While I am not a fan of potential bosses requesting access to my personal Facebook or Twitter pages (it would be timely to note I hardly ever accept friend or follower requests from colleagues), I do think HR has to determine how they intend to manage social media and its impact.

Let me know what you think and how your company manages social media both inside and outside the office.

PS: I just realised the irony of this post, considering I am the office snitch after all. C’est la vie!

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HRTV: Small Talk on employees censoring online profiles

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Singapore – With half of employees in Singapore concerned their careers may be affected by social networking sites, it is not much of a surprise that many are censoring information they put up.

A survey by Kelly Services has revealed 46% of local professionals believe the personal content found on sites like LinkedIn and Facebook can “adversely affect” their job prospects.

“[Employees] need to be careful that they are tapping into the best elements of the Internet when their careers are involved,” Melissa Norman, Kelly Services’ managing director for Singapore and Malaysia, said. With such sites making it easy to put up information, she added there is a “tendency for people to share more than they think”.

In the latest episode of Small Talk, Lee Xieli and Sabrina Zolkifi discuss whether it is right for employees to edit the data they present online, and what HR can do to better utilise such sites in their recruitment process

They also talk about the “brain drain” experienced by Malaysia, and why short term incentives such as resident passes and apprenticeships are ineffective to retain locals and attract overseas talent.

Additionally, Small Talk explores interview blunders which can jeopardise your job opportunities. A recent survey by CareerBuilders.com indentified some of the most unbelievable mistakes, including a man who revealed he was fired from his previous job after beating up his boss.

Other don’ts during an interview include picking your nose or asking the interviewer to leave his own office so the candidate can take a “private” call.


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Written by Sabrina Zolkifi

May 20, 2011 at 11:59 am

HRTV: Small Talk on why engagement surveys fail

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Singapore – The results from your internal employee engagement surveys may not be as truthful as you think.

This is because many companies usually make 10 key mistakes when carrying out engagement surveys. Brad Federman, president of Performancepoint, said one of the biggest mistakes an organisation can make is to ignore the “big brother syndrome”.

“People rate the organisation well because they know the company has access to their ratings. If you want insights to strengthen your organisation, do yourself a favour and use a third party,” he said

Small Talk discuss other survey blunders companies can avoid, and why some times, conflicts between different business divisions can be healthy. It also discusses why social media sites can sabotage your working relationships with colleagues.

More than half of 400 respondents in a Robert Half survey said social media has negatively impacted their workplace relationships.

Small Talk also shares what employees can do to project a professional image online, and the part HR can play in creating a better employer branding strategy.

Martin Cerullo, managing director for development for Alexander Mann Solutions in Asia Pacific, said a good employer brand can increase retention rates and loyalty.

“It’s very important for organisations to work on their brand at the very beginning of a programme, so they can get support from all the leaders in the business and not just human resources.”


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Written by Sabrina Zolkifi

April 15, 2011 at 1:30 pm

HRTV: Small Talk on how social media affects your job

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Singapore – Social networks such as Facebook and Twitter have become extensions of our real lives, so it’s no surprises than that they could affect people’s work decisions as well.

According to the quarterly Randstad Workmonitor, nearly 60% of 405 local respondents use social media to research on a potential employer. Another 60% also added they would not consider working for a company if there have been negative comments made about them on social media.

Lee Xieli and Sabrina Zolkifi discuss the influence social media has on today’s employees, as well as why letting employees go can turn out to be a good thing for some organisations.

They also talk about the possibility of bringing pets to work, and what human resources can do to help welcome more workers with disabilities into the workplace.

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HRTV: Talent pool widens with virtual career fairs

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Singapore – With more recruiters going online to widen their candidate pool, employers can now create virtual career booths that give tech-savvy jobseekers information about the company faster and more comprehensively.

Serene Tan, assistant director of human resources for defence-related research and development institution DSO National Laboratories, said companies looking into recruiting via online mediums should make their site interesting and engaging.

Recruiters can include video chat capabilities, welcome messages by senior leaders in the organisation and brochure downloads to give candidates access to information which they may not be able to get at a crowded recruiting event.

“It makes the website come alive and it gives a much better insight than just having a static page,” Tan said.

A virtual job booth is also considered a cheaper alternative for hiring managers because companies can save on the construction costs of the physical booth and the printing cost of materials.  Furthermore, fewer employees are needed to man an online booth. This helps companies save on the man-hours spent at traditional career fairs.

But a virtual job booth should not remove the need for having the presence of hiring managers or company representatives onsite.

Tan said it should act as “a complement to having a physical fair”. She added, “For the younger generation, who are very much into the Internet and smart devices, it provides an interesting gateway for them.”

But the greatest advantage employers can get from a virtual fair, aside from its cost-effectiveness, is that it is “accessible to potential candidates 24/7”, Tan said. Jobseekers can easily clarify doubts or ask questions through the online chat capability.

“While nothing can quite replace the effectiveness of a real face-to-face interview, this makes for a different kind of close interaction,” Loh Pui Wah, Nanyang Technical University’s (NTU) director for the career and attachment office said.

To read the full article: http://www.humanresourcesonline.net/news/24807

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HRTV: Social media adds “richness” to your CV

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Singapore – Technology is changing the way people are recruiting, and with more candidates connecting their CVs to their online profiles.

Martin Cerullo, managing director for development at Alexander Mann Solutions, said online CVs add “richness of data on someone”, and provide employers with a more three-dimensional sense of the candidates.

While social media and interactive online CVs don’t look to be phasing out traditional interview methods any time soon, the trend is expected to stay, said Cerullo. He sat down with HRTV to discuss how companies are now looking for employees who are committed to an organisation, and those whose values match the company’s.

Cerullo also gives recruitment advice for employers looking to hire in Asia Pacific this year, and shared his take on why employer branding is important to an organisation.

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Written by Sabrina Zolkifi

February 9, 2011 at 12:07 pm